January 12, 1913 Castle Point Lighthouse, located near the village of Castlepoint on the southeastern coast of New Zealand’s North Island, was first officially lit. The 75-foot (23-meter)-tall lighthouse was constructed to help guide and protect vessels sailing in the vicinity of the North Island’s southeastern shoreline, an area that can be dangerous due to local reefs and shallows... Continue Reading →

January 11, 1986 The Gateway Bridge, spanning the Brisbane River in the state of Queensland in northeastern Australia (specifically along the eastern suburbs of the city of Brisbane), was opened to the public. These inaugural festivities, which one newspaper characterized as “a resounding success,” included approximately 200,000 individuals walking across the new bridge. At that time,... Continue Reading →

January 5, 1903 Air navigator and aviation pioneer Harold Gatty was born in Campbell Town in the Australian state of Tasmania. Gatty’s navigational career began in earnest when he withdrew from the Royal Australian Naval College in 1920 to serve as an apprenticed ship’s officer with the Sydney-based Patrick Steamship Company. While employed by this... Continue Reading →

December 17, 2006 The Eleanor Schonell Bridge was formally opened almost two months ahead of schedule in the city of Brisbane in the Australian state of Queensland. This 1,706-foot (520-meter)-long structure crosses the section of the Brisbane River between Brisbane’s inner suburb of Dutton Park and the St Lucia campus of the University of Queensland... Continue Reading →

October 30, 1905 In Australia, a newly built electric tram system first went into service in the town (present-day city) of Fremantle in the state of Western Australia. This system, which was owned and operated by the Fremantle Municipal Tramways, was the first-ever public transportation network in that town. In an even broader context, the... Continue Reading →

September 28, 1899 The first electric trams to operate in Perth, the capital city of what was then the British colony of Western Australia, made their official debut. (A little over a year later, Western Australia became a state as part of the newly formed Commonwealth of Australia.) The new transit system – owned and... Continue Reading →

August 21, 1958 In New Zealand, Auckland became the first city of that Pacific island country to adopt a street-crossing system for pedestrians that had originated several years earlier in North America. The system, which is generally known as the “pedestrian scramble” and has also been called the “Barnes Dance,” entails having all motor vehicle traffic... Continue Reading →

June 25, 2015 A highway tunnel named Legacy Way made its official debut in the city of Brisbane in the Australian state of Queensland. In keeping with an announcement that had been made by Lord Mayor Graham Quirk of Brisbane, the 2.9-mile (4.6-kilometer) tunnel was not actually opened to traffic until late that night. Legacy... Continue Reading →

June 18, 2018 As work on a suspension pedestrian bridge in Australia neared completion, the LED lighting on that new structure was officially tested for the first time. This Monday evening trial run, according to the West Australian newspaper, was held “with the inclement weather failing to dampen the colorful display.” The bridge crosses over... Continue Reading →

June 4, 1929 A new tunnel was officially opened for trams (streetcars) traveling through Northland, a suburb of New Zealand’s capital city of Wellington. (Northland is specifically located between two other Wellington suburbs, Karori and Kelburn.) That day’s edition of the Wellington-based Evening Post highlighted the new Northland Tunnel and what it meant for local... Continue Reading →

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