January 14, 2010 On New Zealand’s North Island, a recently completed version of a railway station building in the Auckland suburb of Newmarket was formally opened. The Newmarket railway station had first gone into service in 1873, and it originally consisted of a single island platform that could be accessed only via a ramp or... Continue Reading →

December 30, 1880 The Kawarau Gorge Suspension Bridge in the Otago region of New Zealand’s South Island was formally dedicated. By that time, the bridge – situated 141 feet (43 meters) above the Kawarau River -- had already been in use for a month. This bridge was named for the river gorge where it is... Continue Reading →

December 28, 1975 After nearly 96 years of being maintained and operated by resident keepers, a lighthouse off the coast of the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW) became officially unmanned. This lighthouse is located on South Solitary Island, which is about 9.3 miles (15 kilometers) northeast of the city of Coffs Harbour on... Continue Reading →

October 18, 1869 In Australia, a railway station in the town of Bowenfels in the colony (now state) of New South Wales (NSW) was opened. The Bowenfels railway station was built as part of the Main Western Railway (also known as the Main Western Line) in that region of Australia. This station was designed by... Continue Reading →

September 28, 1970 More than four decades after her debut, the steam-powered Australian tugboat named Forceful was officially retired from service. This seagoing vessel had been constructed by the shipbuilding company Alexander Stephen & Sons Limited and launched in Scotland in 1925. Forceful subsequently sailed from the River Clyde in Scotland to her assigned homeport... Continue Reading →

June 29, 1963 Cobham Bridge in the city of Hamilton on New Zealand’s North Island was officially opened. This girder bridge, measuring 470 feet (143.3 meters) in length, carries Cobham Drive over the Waikato River. (Cobham Drive is part of State Highway 1, the longest route in New Zealand’s road network.) Those on hand for... Continue Reading →

June 17, 1935 On the southern tip of New Zealand’s North Island, a lighthouse in the vicinity of the capital city of Wellington began operations. This concrete structure, situated on a narrow piece of the coastline known as Baring Head (Ōrua-pouanui), had been built to replace a longtime lighthouse at nearby Pencarrow Head as a... Continue Reading →

May 18, 1940 A highway bridge built across the Manning River in the town of Taree in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW) made its public debut. This steel truss bridge was officially opened by Alexander Mair, who served as premier of NSW from 1939 to 1941. The structure replaced a steam-driven ferry... Continue Reading →

April 20, 1954 A pivotal milestone took place in the development of the Rimutaka Tunnel, which runs through the mountain chain now called the Remutaka Range (known as the Rimutaka Range until 2017) in the southernmost region of New Zealand’s North Island. (This railway tunnel is specifically located between Maymorn, a rural section of the... Continue Reading →

March 30, 1893 The Te Aro Extension, a short branch line railway that was part of the long-distance railway known as the Wairarapa Line on New Zealand’s North Island, was opened to the public. The 1.1-mile (1.8 kilometer) Te Aro Extension, which was also called the Te Aro Branch, was built in the city of... Continue Reading →

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