September 18, 1831 Automotive pioneer Siegfried Samuel Marcus was born in the town of Malchin in the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, which is now part of the Federal Republic of Germany. By the mid-1850s, Marcus had moved to Vienna and worked in that city as a manufacturer of scientific instruments until his death in 1898.... Continue Reading →

September 10, 1962 Construction began on twin tunnels in the city and unitary authority area of Newport in southern Wales. These tunnels were built to carry M4 of the United Kingdom (UK) motorway network under Brynglas Hill in that region of Wales. Sir Owen Williams, the prolific English engineer and architect, was in charge of... Continue Reading →

September 4, 1894 A newly built lifeboat was launched at Sheringham, an English town along the North Sea. This rescue vessel replaced the lifeboat Augusta, which had been stationed at Sheringham since 1838.The new lifeboat had been constructed by Sheringham native Lewis “Buffalo” Emery and was provided to the town by a prominent local resident... Continue Reading →

September 1, 1816 A new lighthouse went into service on the Isle of May, which is approximately five miles (eight kilometers) off the coast of mainland Scotland. This lighthouse replaced one that was a coal-fired beacon built sometime during the 1630s. The original lighthouse was the first navigational aid on Scottish soil to be staffed... Continue Reading →

August 28, 2018 In England’s North East region, the recently completed Northern Spire Bridge within the city and metropolitan borough of Sunderland was opened to pedestrians. This two-span cable-stayed bridge carries the highway A1231 over the River Wear and serves as a link between the Sunderland suburbs of Pallion and Castletown. The 1,102-foot (336-meter)-long structure... Continue Reading →

August 17, 1903 The Great Western Railway (GWR), which originated in the 1830s and operated throughout western England as well as most of Wales, began a new type of transit option for its passengers traveling to rural areas without direct access to trains. The GWR road motor services were seen as a cheaper alternative to building... Continue Reading →

August 13, 1929 A pedestrian advocacy organization that has been not only long-lived but influential was established at a meeting at Essex Hall in London, England. The Pedestrians’ Association was formed in response to the dramatic increase in automobiles throughout England during the 1920s and the resultant road fatalities -- a large portion involving pedestrians --... Continue Reading →

August 11, 1986 Test pilot Trevor Egginton established a new speed record for conventional helicopters. He did so by reaching a speed of 249.1 miles (400.9 kilometers) per hour in a helicopter that he flew in the skies above southwestern England. Egginton was accompanied by flight test engineer Derek J. Clews. The helicopter used for... Continue Reading →

August 4, 1900 Jean Joseph Étienne Lenoir, who invented the first practical and commercially successful internal combustion engine, died in the French town of La Varenne-Saint-Hilaire (near Paris) at the age of 78. Lenoir had been born in 1822 in Mussy-la-Ville, which was a community in Luxembourg at the time and is now part of Belgium. An... Continue Reading →

July 7, 1902 Two months after being christened, the sailing vessel Preußen – named in honor of the German kingdom and state of Prussia – was completed at the Joh. C. Tecklenborg shipyard in the German Empire’s seaport of Geestemünde (now part of the city of Bremerhaven in the Republic of Germany). Preußen, which is... Continue Reading →

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