July 16, 1965 The Mont Blanc Tunnel was officially dedicated. This road tunnel, which is located beneath Mont Blanc in the Alps, links the town of Chamonix in southeastern France with the resort village of Courmayeur in northwestern Italy. (Mont Blanc is the highest mountain in not only the Alps but also all of Europe.)... Continue Reading →

July 13, 1879 Civil engineer and prestressed concrete pioneer Eugène Freyssinet was born in the commune of Objat in central France. By the time that World War I broke out in 1914, Freyssinet had designed several major bridges in France. A leading example of Freyssinet’s work in those pre-war years was the Pont le Veurdre near... Continue Reading →

July 8, 1856 A railway station was opened in the hamlet of Broomielaw in northeastern England as part of the Darlington and Barnard Castle Railway’s line serving that region. Unlike the other stations along the line that were also opened at the time, Broomielaw railway station was originally not intended for public use. The facility... Continue Reading →

July 6, 1926 The first test flight of the racing seaplane Macchi M.39 took place in Italy. This seaplane had been designed by engineer Mario Castoldi, and it was built by the aircraft company Aeronautica Macchi (based in the city and comune of Varese in northwestern Italy). The first M.39 to take to the skies... Continue Reading →

June 23, 2007 A dedication ceremony was held for the Sitina Tunnel in Bratislava, the capital and largest city of the country of Slovakia in central Europe. This tunnel carries the D2 motorway underneath a section of the mountain range known as the Little Carpathians (a part of the Carpathian Mountains). The Sitina Tunnel was... Continue Reading →

June 22, 1870 A railway station in Cheshire County in northwest England first went into service. This facility is 9.5 miles (15 kilometers) east of the city of Chester, and it is specifically situated in the village of Delamere. That village, which owes its name to the French phrase “de la mere” (“of the sea”),... Continue Reading →

June 8, 1724 Engineer and physicist John Smeaton, who is widely regarded as the “Father of Civil Engineering,” was born in the English civil parish of Austhorpe. During his prolific career, Smeaton designed numerous lighthouses, bridges, canals, and harbors.  One of Smeaton’s more notable achievements was a lighthouse that became known as Smeaton’s Tower. This 72-foot... Continue Reading →

June 4, 1784 A pioneering ascent of a hot-air balloon took place just outside the city of Lyon in southeastern France. This balloon was named the Gustave in honor of King Gustav III of Sweden. The king was visiting Lyon at that time, and he was among those on hand to watch the aircraft take... Continue Reading →

June 3, 2003 A new version of the Djupfjord Bridge in Nordland county in Norway’s northern region made its debut. This structure, which carries European route E10 over a section of the Djupfjorden (a deep and narrow inlet of the sea) within the municipality of Moskenes, replaced a bridge that had been in service at... Continue Reading →

May 24, 1914 The sixth annual Italian bicycle race known as the Giro d’Italia (Tour of Italy) began in the city of Milan. The multi-day competition was organized by the Milan-based La Gazzetta dello Sport (The Sports Gazette); that newspaper initiated the annual race in 1909 and served as its sponsor. A total of 81 bicyclists... Continue Reading →

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