April 2, 1914 In Canada, construction began on the Connaught Tunnel under Rogers Pass in the Selkirk Mountains in southeastern British Columbia. This tunnel carries the Canadian Pacific Railway main between Calgary, Alberta, and Revelstoke, British Columbia, and was built to replace the railroad’s previous routing over the sometimes hazardous Rogers Pass.  The tunnel – measuring... Continue Reading →

April 1, 1967 The recently created U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) formally began operations as the 12th federal cabinet department with a considerable amount of fun and fanfare on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Thousands gathered at that park in the nation’s capital for a celebration featuring a broad-based transportation theme and including music from... Continue Reading →

Joan Newton Cuneo, who played a trailblazing role for female race car drivers, was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, in 1876. She was the last of four daughters born to Leila Vulte and John Carter Newton. Joan’s strong interest in transportation took root early on in her life. As a child – and under her indulgent... Continue Reading →

March 30, 1893 The Te Aro Extension, a short branch line railway that was part of the long-distance railway known as the Wairarapa Line on New Zealand’s North Island, was opened to the public. The 1.1-mile (1.8 kilometer) Te Aro Extension, which was also called the Te Aro Branch, was built in the city of... Continue Reading →

March 29, 1930 The Longview Bridge, spanning the Columbia River, was officially opened. This structure serves as a link between the cities of Longview, Washington, and Rainier, Oregon. The bridge was designed by structural engineer Joseph Strauss, who also played a major role in the creation of the iconic Golden Gate Bridge in California. The... Continue Reading →

March 26, 2006 The Tunnel Tiergarten Spreebogen in the central area of Berlin was opened to vehicular traffic. This structure is part of the federal highway designated as the Bundesstraße 96, and it serves as a link between Berlin Hauptbahnhof, the main railway station in Germany’s capital city; and the locality (neighborhood) of Tiergarten in the... Continue Reading →

March 25, 1932 The Anacapa Island Lighthouse on the entrance to Santa Barbara Channel – a section of the Pacific Ocean between the Southern California coast and the northern Channel Islands – made its debut. Anacapa Island is actually a chain of three small islets; the lighthouse was built on the easternmost islet, which is a... Continue Reading →

In 1977, Janna Lambine became the U.S. Coast Guard’s first female pilot. She earned her wings as an aviator after she completed flight training at Naval Air Station (NAS) Whiting Field near Milton, Florida. “It’s nice to be the first,” Lambine said in an interview published the following month in the New Mexico-based Clovis News-Journal. “I’ve never... Continue Reading →

March 23, 2013 A station of the Paris Métro rapid transit system made its debut near the town hall of Montrouge, a commune in the southern suburbs of France’s capital city. This station is formally known as Mairie de Montrouge (Town Hall of Montrouge), and it was the 302nd station of the Paris Métro to... Continue Reading →

March 22, 2016 A pedestrian bridge at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) was officially opened to foot traffic. The Moody Pedestrian Bridge crosses over a section of West Dean Keaton Street that is near the outer edge of that university’s campus. This bridge serves as a connection between facilities that are part... Continue Reading →

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