October 16, 1965 After more than a decade with the reserve fleet at Suisun Bay in northern California, the United States Navy hospital ship USS Repose (AH-16) was recommissioned for service in the Vietnam War. The vessel dated back to the World War II era, having been built in 1943 by the Sun Shipbuilding &... Continue Reading →

October 9, 1935 Harvey A. Moyer, a prolific transportation entrepreneur who manufactured both horse-drawn carriages and luxury automobiles, died in Syracuse, New York, at the age of 62. Moyer, who had been born in the New York town of Clay in 1853, demonstrated a strong interest in creating vehicles relatively early on in life. When... Continue Reading →

July 26, 1933 A record-setting dry dock was formally dedicated at the port city of Southampton on England’s southern coast. This new facility was specifically a graving dock, which is a basin into which a vessel can be floated for maintenance and repairs. After the water is temporarily pumped out of the basin, the vessel... Continue Reading →

July 9, 1930 A bridge was officially opened in northeastern Montana to a great deal of fanfare. The new structure, spanning the Missouri River between McCone and Roosevelt counties in the Big Sky Country, was named the Lewis and Clark Bridge. (In May 1805, the Corps of Discovery Expedition led by Meriwether Lewis and William... Continue Reading →

June 4, 1896 After two years of experimentation, automotive pioneer Henry Ford unveiled his recently completed Ford Quadricycle and took it out for an early morning test drive in Detroit. The vehicle, which was his first automobile, had a light metal frame supported by four bicycle wheels. One likely reason why Ford named this vehicle... Continue Reading →

Aviation pioneer Harriet Quimby became the first woman to fly across the English Channel. The Michigan-born pilot departed Dover, England, for Calais, France, in a monoplane that she had never flown before and with a compass she had just recently learned to use. Quimby, despite those challenges as well as thick fog that limited visibility... Continue Reading →

Today in African-American Transportation History - 1997: A Trailblazer Retires from the U.S. Air Force African-American aviation pioneer and U.S. Air Force (USAF) Major General Marcelite Jordan Harris retired after more than three decades of service in the nation's military aerial service branch.  Harris, who was born in Texas in 1943, initially sought to pursue... Continue Reading →

During a ceremony at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, Continental Airlines officially named a Boeing 737-824 jet after African-American aviation pioneer Marlon DeWitt Green. This ceremony took place a little over six months following Green’s death in Denver at the age of 80 and nearly a half-century after his landmark legal battle against Continental... Continue Reading →

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