September 12, 1978 On New Zealand’s North Island, the Kamai Tunnel along the East Coast Main Trunk Railway was formally opened. Construction on the rail tunnel, which runs for 5.5 miles (8.9 kilometers) underneath the heavily forested Kamai Range, started in 1965 with a turning-of-the-sod ceremony officiated by New Zealand’s Works Minister Percy Allen. The... Continue Reading →

August 8, 1863 The Lady Barkly, widely regarded as the first steam-powered locomotive to operate in New Zealand, went into service in the township (and present-day city) of Invercargill on the South Island. The experimental run of this 8-ton (7.3-metric ton) train in Invercargill marked a major transportation milestone for New Zealand and in particular... Continue Reading →

June 5, 2010 In the western region of New Zealand’s North Island, a bridge for pedestrians and bicyclists made its debut at the city of New Plymouth. Te Rewa Rewa Bridge, which measures 229.7 feet (70 meters) in length and crosses the Waiwhakaiho River, was officially opened by Peter Tennent, mayor of New Plymouth; and... Continue Reading →

On New Zealand’s North Island, a new vehicular bridge spanning the Waikato River was opened. Victoria Bridge serves as a link between the town of Cambridge and a community that is now known as Leamington. Plans for a bridge at that location had been under development for several years. New Zealand surveyor and engineer James... Continue Reading →

On the eastern coast of New Zealand’s South Island, a new section of a cycling and walking trail was opened between the towns of Prebbleton and Lincoln. This section, an off-road asphalt pathway measuring approximately four miles (7.7 kilometers) in length, is a part of the Little River Rail Trail. The dedication ceremony for the... Continue Reading →

Robert Julian Scott, whose interests and accomplishments involved several modes of transportation during his many years in New Zealand, died in the city of Christchurch at the age of 69. Scott had been born in Plymouth, England, in 1861. After completing his education, he worked briefly for the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway under... Continue Reading →

On New Zealand’s South Island, a railway between Christchurch and Dunedin made its official debut. “The opening of the Dunedin and Christchurch line, the great event of connecting the two commercial cities of the South Island by means of the iron horse, was consummated today,” announced the Wellington –based Evening post in its coverage of... Continue Reading →

The Otira Tunnel serving the Midland Railway line within the central part of New Zealand’s South Island was officially opened. The tunnel, which runs under the Southern Alps between Arthur’s Pass in that mountain range and the township of Otira, took approximately 15 years to build. The debut of the Otira Tunnel was hailed throughout... Continue Reading →

In New Zealand, Bean Rock Lighthouse in Auckland’s Waitematā Harbour made its debut when keeper Hugh Brown lit a kerosene lamp in the new structure. (Brown served as the lighthouse’s keeper until retiring in 1890.) Bean Rock Lighthouse had been built in response to ever-increasing maritime traffic in this area of New Zealand; one of... Continue Reading →

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