In the midst of World War II, U.S. Navy Commander Gordon Paiʻea Chung-Hoon (1910-1979) took over command of the Fletcher-class destroyer USS Sigsbee in the Pacific Theater. Chung-Hoon, who was born in Honolulu to a Chinese-English-Hawaiian father and a Hawaiian mother, had made history in 1934 as the first person to be both an Asian-American and... Continue Reading →

The USS Tullibee, the smallest nuclear-powered attack submarine in the US fleet was launched in Groton, Connecticut. Small, in this case, is relative: Tullibee was 273 feet (83.2m) long and displaced 2300 tons at the surface. In comparison, the other notable nuclear-powered sub of the time, the USS Nautilus, was 320 feet (97.5m) and displaced... Continue Reading →

Two new hydrographic survey ships were commissioned into the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). These vessels, USC&GS Rude and USC&GS Heck, were described in the April 1970 issue of the U.S. Navy magazine All Hands as “wire drag ships, the only ones of their kind in the United States, which search out underwater navigational... Continue Reading →

A World War II ship that played an important role in African-American history was decommissioned by the U.S. Navy. The submarine chaser USS PC-1264, which had been launched during the fall of 1943, was one of only two Navy ships during the war to have a predominantly African-American crew. (The other vessel with this distinction... Continue Reading →

Gordon Paiʻea Chung-Hoon, who was born in Honolulu in 1910 to a Chinese-English-Hawaiian father and a Hawaiian mother, was a U.S. maritime transportation pioneer in a couple of key respects. Chung-Hoon attended the U.S. Naval Academy and, in 1934, he made history as the first person to be both an Asian American and U.S. citizen... Continue Reading →

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