Today in Transportation History – A Cloverleaf Interchange for Accra: February 27, 2005

Just over two months before being completed, the Tetteh Quarshie Interchange in Ghana’s capital city of Accra was first opened to traffic. The two-level roadway junction, which features non-directional loop ramps, is formally known as a cloverleaf interchange because of its resemblance to a four-leaf clover when viewed from above or depicted on maps. The Interchange was built to replace the Akuafo Circle – the largest roundabout in Ghana at the time – and better accommodate the ever-growing vehicular traffic in that section of the West African nation’s most populous city.

The funding for the construction of the Interchange was provided by the African Development Bank Group, a finance institution that contributes to the socioeconomic development of African nations. The construction work, which was performed by the Israeli roadbuilding firm SONITRA-RCCN Joint Ventures, officially began in January 2003 with a groundbreaking ceremony led by Ghanaian President John Agyekum Kufuor.

The Interchange serves as a major highway link for the Greater Accra region. The routes traveling through the interchange are the Tema Motorway (the only motorway in Ghana), which connects Accra with the city of Tema; the Liberation Road; and the Legon East Road. The Tetteh Quarshie was only the second interchange to open in all of Ghana; the first was the Sankara Interchange (now known as the Ako-Adjei Interchange), a grade-separated junction between different roads that made its debut elsewhere in Accra in 1999.

The Tetteh Quarshie remains one of the largest interchanges in Ghana. The interchange was named after a renowned agriculturalist who helped introduce cocoa crops to Ghana on a large-scale basis. This crop is now one of Ghana’s leading exports.

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