Today in Transportation History – 1969: Mexico City Gets a New Metro Station

Metro San Lázaro, one of the earliest stations of the Mexico City Metro rapid transit system, was opened in the Venustiano Carranza municipality in Mexico’s capital city. Metro San Lázaro is located near the permanent meeting place of the Chamber of Deputies, which is the lower house of the Mexican government’s legislative branch (Congress of the Union).

Metro San Lázaro is on both Lines 1 and B of the Mexico City Metro. The station is also connected with TAPO (Terminal de Autobuses de Pasajeros de Oriente), a wide-ranging bus facility that serves a total of 14 states within Mexico.

The logo at Metro San Lázaro depicts a steam locomotive to acknowledge that the station was built near the main terminus for the Interoceanic Railway of Mexico; this railway, which existed from 1891 to 1903, linked Mexico City with the port of Veracruz on the Gulf of Mexico.

Metro San Lázaro was designed by renowned architect Félix Candela, who had immigrated to Mexico from his native Spain in 1936 at the age of 26. When it came to the design of buildings in his adopted homeland, Candela proved to be highly industrious. It has been estimated that, during the 1950s and 1960s alone, he was responsible for approximately 900 projects. Candela also contributed significantly to innovations in Mexican architecture and structural engineering. A key example of his style can be seen in Metro San Lázaro, which features interlocked and saddle-like roof sections.

For more information about Metro San Lázaro, please check out https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metro_San_L%C3%A1zaro

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